The Convoluted Message Behind the Whiteness Project

May 13, 2016 at 1:26 pm |
By

The Silent Majority

Minorities and other marginalized, disenfranchised groups often remain repressed by the mere fact that they don’t have a voice with which to speak out against the imbalanced or unfair societies in which they live.

As we move slowly-but-hopefully-surely towards a more equal society that learns to embrace our similarities instead of focusing on our differences, these minorities are often overrepresented in order to maximize their opportunities and normalize their presence, making people realize that they do, indeed, exist. And yet simply by trying to balance the scales, members of the majority will always feel threatened.

In our society that tries its hardest to remain PC and not tread on anybody’s toes, you may constantly find yourself questioning if your words and actions are acceptable. One of the strangest effects that empathizing with the plight many minorities face in the United States is feeling the reverse guilt that people report simply for being white. This can lead to a misplaced victimization which is typically a reaction to a changing status quo, a shifting tide in race relations. But are the people who feel this alleged remorse even aware of the institutional racism of the system that has allowed them to rise to and remain at the top?

The Whiteness Project is a social experiment that set out to find out how the silent majority of American teens who identify as white feel about their skin color, and nobody’s quite sure what to think of it.

whitness project intro doesnt see color

Source: Facebook/ Let’s Talk: Whiteness Project

Should they be ashamed of their whiteness?

Is white pride the same thing as racism? The Whiteness Project walks a fine line.

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