Why Do Mosquitos Bite Some But Not Others? Science Can explain Why

Feb 23, 2016 at 11:19 am |
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Mosquitos Have Feelings, Too!

The native New Yorkers I share this wonderful city with would say that I pretty much literally grew up in the woods. Far from metropolitan, my hometown was more of a village sprawling among ponds, natural fields, and hundreds of acres of original forrest.

If your childhood was anything like mine, then you know the endless summer mosquito struggle all too well. You step out into nature one time and suddenly your ankles and knees (my personal target zones) are itchy and raw with bites from the little blood suckers.

why do mosquitos bite some and not others?

Source: Shutterstock.com

But why do mosquitos seem to be attracted to some more than others? I don’t think my sister has ever had a single bite in her life, and yet here I am, every summer, slowly being eaten alive by bugs I can barely even see.

Now we may be closer than ever to answering that question thanks to a new study in PLOS that used groups of female twins, both fraternal and identical, to study and control the genetic and environmental variables that might be contributing to our appetizing, or repulsive, affect on mosquitos.

So what is it that makes us so damn tasty to the pesky insects? Environment, lifestyle, or pure genetics?

Keep Reading to find out how this twin study has solved the mosquito paradox for good!

Finally, an answer to the question: do some people just have especially delicious blood?

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